Dr. Julie Sanchez Image

Dr. Julie sanchez

Dr. Julie Sanchez is a Licensed Clinical Forensic Psychologist (PSY CA 31013). Dr. Sanchez graduated from the University of San Francisco with a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology in 2005.She moved back to the San Fernando Valley to pursue a career in social work and advocacy for underserved communities. She assisted clients in advocating for special education services in the public-school system, as well as non-public school placement and residential placement. She assisted clients with linkage to Regional Center services, Social Security Disability Income, In-Home Support Services, legal services, housing support, and medication support. She spent 5 years working as a group home counselor, DCFS social worker, case manager, and family advocate before pursuing a doctorate degree at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

In 2014, Dr. Sanchez graduated with degree in Clinical Forensic Psychology. She has extensive experience working with children, teens, and adults conducting individual, group, family and couple’s psychotherapy, in English and Spanish. Dr. Sanchez specializes in working with clients with complex trauma, depression, anxiety, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, severe and persistent mental illness, crisis intervention, and children/teens with prenatal alcohol exposure. She is trained in mindfulness meditation, dialectical behavioral therapy, trauma focused cognitive behavioral therapy, seeking safety, Triple P (Positive Parenting Program), and MAP.

She has forensic experience in conducting MDO (Mentally Disordered Offender) evaluations for inmates at the California Department of Corrections and submitting integrative reports to the parole board. Dr. Sanchez has a passion for working with underserved and under-represented communities not only as a clinician, but as a professor at Pacific Oaks College. She has taught in the Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) program, Latino and African American cohorts, and strives to instill the importance of cultural competence and advocacy in all of her students. She sees herself not only as a psychologist, but as an advocate who views the needs of the whole person and how genetic, family, community, and systematic barriers impact mental health.